Musical Routes

A Landscape for Music Education

Musical Routes is a study and report undertaken by Sarah Derbyshire MBE, independently commissioned and in partnership with the Royal Philharmonic Society.

The report assesses the access which children and young people have to music education, the equality of access, and whether that access will enable them to fulfill their individual musical potential.

Bringing together, for the first time, recent research by national bodies, evaluation reports on recent and current music education initiatives, online surveys of professional music organisations and Music Services/Hubs and interviews with representatives of music organisations and music education providers, the report examines the nature of the opportunities offered, who provides them, and whether and how they equip young musicians for continuing their musical journey.

The report attempts to draw together findings and views from across the profession, cross-referencing and identifying commonalities so that the music education and professional music sectors can begin to articulate shared aims and ambitions for future development.  It should be welcomed by anyone who love and cares about music.

Musical Routes was published and launched on 25 September 2015 at Wigmore Hall. 

Thank you to all the Professional Music Organisations, Music Services/Hubs and their representatives who took part in the study. If you missed the opportunity to complete one of the questionnaires, would like to make a particular comment or contribution, or send your feedback on the published report then please contact us.

The RPS is grateful to the J Paul Getty Jr Charitable Trust and to many other individuals whose concern for the future of music education prompted them to contribute to the funding of the report.

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OUR MEMBERS

Chi-chi Nwanoku MBE, Founder, Artistic and Executive Director, Chineke! Foundation; Founder, principal Double Bass, OAE: As a musician it feels vital to be part of the RPS family, and its endeavours to go-all-out for the sake of music.

DID YOU KNOW?

Before there were traffic lights: coachmen delivering audience members to Philharmonic Society concerts at the Harmonic Institution were asked to ‘set down and take up with their horses’ heads facing Piccadilly’.