Mebrakh Haughton-Johnson

RPS Instrument Purchase Grant 2019 | £1,000 towards a Tenor Saxophone

Mebrakh studies clarinet and saxophone at the Royal College of Music as a Victoria Robey Scholar and a Royal Philharmonic Society Grantee. He was a Guildhall Young Artists scholar, received the Lizbeth Elliot Prize for Woodwind by the Centre for Young Musicians (Guildhall) and also won 2nd Prize in their Louis Watt Competition.

Aside from taking part in RCM-led ensembles, Mebrakh relishes in opportunities to play chamber music and regularly performs with his Saxophone Quartet, Wind Quintet and Clarinet, Violin and Piano Trio. As a member of the Chineke! Foundation, he has played a variety of repertoire in renowned concert halls and palaces. He made his international debut in Germany with renowned jazz trio Jason Moran and the Bandwagon playing the clarinet and flute and continues to work with them. The music was showcased at Barbican, Berliner Festspiele and other venues as part of their tour with Tomorrow’s Warriors.

Mebrakh has played alongside West End musicians and producers in the 4* production tour of Ain’t Misbehavin’ where he played the clarinet and tenor saxophone. As reed player for the Nu Civilisation Orchestra, he has taken part in the televised BBC Proms 2019 playing Duke Ellington’s Sacred Concerts. With NCO he has also worked in collaboration with BBC Concert Orchestra.

Further to his jazz development Mebrakh has performed at Ronnie Scott’s Jazz Club with World Heart Beat and is particularly passionate about mentoring younger children; he has volunteered with the Soothsayers in schools in Germany where he tutored infants and adolescents in reggae and ska music.

Aside from private tuition, Mebrakh is presently facilitating woodwind lessons in primary schools in association with the Gypsy Hill Federation.

OUR MEMBERS

Dr Ahmad Sarmast: RPS Honorary Member and founder of Afghanistan’s first national music school in Kabul.

DID YOU KNOW?

In 2002 the Society sold its historic archive of papers, letters and musical manuscripts to the British Library, where it is now open to the public from all over the world.