Jessica Hughes

2018 RPS Instrument Purchase Grant | Harp

Jess Hughes has been studying the harp with Ruth Faber since the age of 10. She has just finished her final year as a Specialist Musician Scholar at Wells Cathedral School, and will continue her studies at the Royal Northern College of Music in September under Eira Lynn Jones.

As both a soloist and orchestral player, Jess has performed in many venues including Wells Cathedral, Glastonbury Abbey and Cedars Hall - the new WCS concert hall. Three particular highlights from this last academic year include a Christmas concert with the Bath Bach Choir, a 30-minute solo recital for the Friends of Music at WCS and a performance of Holst's The Planets with the school symphony orchestra.

Jess has also competed for several years at the Mid-Somerset, Taunton and Bristol music festivals. In March this year, she won the ‘Recital for Advanced Solo Harp’ class at Mid-Somerset Festival and the ‘Advanced Solo Harp’ class at Bristol Eisteddfod. In the summer of 2016, Jess was invited to play with the National Youth Orchestra during two orchestral residencies under the guidance of Eleanor Hudson and Cathy White. This year she went on tour to the south of France with the West of England Youth Orchestra, playing Rimsky-Korsakov’s Scheherazade, Ravel’s Bolero and a tribute to The Ratpack.

Also learning the piano from an early age, Jess continued to have lessons at WCS and recently passed her Grade 8 exams in both instruments with Distinction.

Jess is very grateful for the support of the Royal Philharmonic Society as she furthers her study of the harp, at conservatoire level, and continues to share the repertoire of this beautiful instrument.

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DID YOU KNOW?

From 1819 the Society’s home was the Harmonic Institution built by John Nash in Regents Street. The building was destroyed by fire in 1830 and is now the site of a NatWest Bank.