In rehearsal: Roderick Williams and Joanna MacGregor

06 Nov 2019

As part of our new series of events, two celebrated musicians exclusively welcomed the RPS into their rehearsal.

We’re remarkably good at hiding how classical music is made, with most rehearsals strictly off limits. What magic happens there? What are the first steps? And what does it really take to get music ready for performance?

Let’s find out. The RPS is pleased to present an entirely new kind of musical experience, inviting you into the rehearsal room with some of our very greatest performers. At uniquely close quarters, you can find out how they shape a piece of music and draw out its true essence.

For the first such event in this new series, we brought together pianist Joanna MacGregor CBE and baritone Roderick Williams OBE – who have never worked together before – to give us a rare glimpse of what happens when two celebrated artists share their instincts and approaches for the very first time.

Filmed in the intimate Angela Burgess Recital Hall at the Royal Academy of Music in October, you can watch an extract of the event above. If you’re an RPS Member, you can enjoy the whole conversation in full in the Members Area of our website. RPS Members can enjoy films of all our talks which this season include events with Nicola Benedetti, Sir Thomas Allen, Sarah Connolly, John Wilson and others. RPS Members can also book first to attend the events in person and meet such stars in person, amid a range of other benefits.

Click the button below to find out more about becoming an RPS Member.

If you’re already an RPS Member, you can log in to the Members Area and watch the complete film.

OUR MEMBERS

Tim Walker, CEO and Artistic Director of the London Philharmonic Orchestra: I value the RPS for supporting what we do and in particular for stimulating an interest in new music.

DID YOU KNOW?

1830: Midsummer Night’s Dream is ‘very beautiful, and encored, but it is awfully, fearfully difficult, so much so that last Saturday morning Mendelssohn was SEVEN hours rehearsing.’