Student Membership

If you’re a student at school or in higher education, you can join the Royal Philharmonic Society for a specially discounted rate. You don’t even need to be studying music.

As a student, the minimum you need to give is £12 a year. In return, you will:

There are two ways to join

Option 1: Donate online
Simply click the button below to set up your Direct Debit (minimum of £12 annually).

PLEASE NOTE: If you are joining as a member as part of a competition application (e.g. RPS Composition Prize, Julius Isserlis Scholarship), please DO NOT check the box which anonymises your donation. If you make your donation anonymous, we will be unable to pair it with your application, which may not be accepted as a result.

When joining online, you will have the option to opt-in to receive e-mail updates from us. This enables us to send you out monthly bulletin especially created for Members to keep you informed about the Society’s charitable endeavours. Please note, if you choose to opt-out, we cannot send you these and will only contact you with customer service messages relating to your Membership transactions, terms and renewals. If you do not wish to receive these customer service messages, you are welcome to contact us. For more information, please read our Privacy Policy.

Option 2: Donate via cheque
Please download a membership form and send along with a cheque (minimum £12) made payable to the ‘Royal Philharmonic Society’ to RPS, 48 Great Marlborough Street, London W1F 7BB.

Please note, these rates are only available to you as a student and will conclude at the end of the year in which you ultimately graduate. We reserve the right to ask Student Members for proof of studentship at any time.

OUR MEMBERS

Jennifer Bate, organist: My worldwide schedule includes recitals, concertos, recordings, masterclasses and composition. The RPS offers excellent opportunities to meet fellow professionals socially.

DID YOU KNOW?

Before there were traffic lights: coachmen delivering audience members to Philharmonic Society concerts at the Harmonic Institution were asked to ‘set down and take up with their horses’ heads facing Piccadilly’.